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Home > All Images > 2004 > January > 20 Jan 2004

Images Dated 20th January 2004

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 56 pictures in our Images Dated 20th January 2004 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Multiple lightning strikes with storm clouds Featured 20 Jan 2004 Print

Multiple lightning strikes with storm clouds

Lightning. Multiple lightning bolts striking the ground. from a storm cloud at night. Lightning occurs when a large electrical charge builds up on a cloud. At first a leader of electrons descends to the ground. As soon as this makes contact an enormous return stroke surges up the leader's ionised path, producing blinding white light and temperatures as high as 30, 000 degrees Celsius.
NOT FOR USE AS RETAIL POSTER
NOT FOR USE AS RETAIL POSTER

© Gordon Garradd/Science Photo Library

Polar bear insulating hair, SEM Featured 20 Jan 2004 Print

Polar bear insulating hair, SEM

Polar bear insulating hair. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a cross-section through a shaft of an insulating hair from a polar bear (Ursus maritimus). This has revealed the hollow structure of the hair that gives it its insulating properties. The hollow in the centre of the hair contains air, which is not a good conductor of heat. This insulates the polar bear from the extreme cold of its Arctic habitat. The air also helps to prevent the hair matting, which helps the polar bear shake itself dry. The hair is also oily to repel water. Insulating hair forms a coarse outer hair layer over underhair (Z927/133). Magnification: x375 when printed 10cm wide

© POWER AND SYRED/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Worm computer virus Featured 20 Jan 2004 Print

Worm computer virus

Computer worms. Conceptual computer artwork of a globe and computer screens with worm shapes (red) representing computer worm programs. Computer worm programs spread through computer networks like the internet, the global network of computers. Worms, unlike computer viruses, do not run using another program. They run independently and carry out the usually malicious instructions in their program, such as deleting computer data. When replicating, they take up bandwidth, the capacity to transmit data over a network. This can slow down the whole internet. Computer worm programs are considered to be more destructive than computer viruses

© VICTOR HABBICK VISIONS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY