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Pioneer Gallery

Choose from 26 pictures in our Pioneer collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Pioneer F Plaque Symbology Featured Pioneer Print

Pioneer F Plaque Symbology

The Pioneer F spacecraft, destined to be the first man made object to escape from the solar system into interstellar space, carries this pictorial plaque. It is designed to show scientifically educated inhabitants of some other star system, who might intercept it millions of years from now, when Pioneer was launched, from where, and by what kind of beings. (With the hope that they would not invade Earth.) The design is etched into a 6 inch by 9 inch gold-anodized aluminum plate, attached to the spacecraft's attenna support struts in a position to help shield it from erosion by interstellar dust. The radiating lines at left represents the positions of 14 pulsars, a cosmic source of radio energy, arranged to indicate our sun as the home star of our civilization. The "1-" symbols at the ends of the lines are binary numbers that represent the frequencies of these pulsars at the time of launch of Pioneer F relative of that to the hydrogen atom shown at the upper left with a "1" unity symbol. The hydrogen atom is thus used as a "universal clock, " and the regular decrease in the frequencies of the pulsars will enable another civilization to determine the time that has elapsed since Pioneer F was launched. The hydrogen is also used as a "universal yardstick" for sizing the human figures and outline of the spacecraft shown on the right. The hydrogen wavelength, about 8 inches, multiplied by the binary number representing "8" shown next to the woman gives her height, 64 inches. The figures represent the type of creature that created Pioneer. The man's hand is raised in a gesture of good will. Across the bottom are the planets, ranging outward from the Sun, with the spacecraft trajectory arching away from Earth, passing Mars, and swinging by Jupiter

© NASA

Von Brauns Mars Project, 1952 Featured Pioneer Print

Von Brauns Mars Project, 1952

This classic on space travel was first published in 1953, when interplanetary space flight was considered science fiction by most of those who considered it at all. Here the German-born scientist Wernher von Braun detailed what he believed were the problems and possibilities inherent in a projected expedition to Mars. Today von Braun is recognized as the person most responsible for laying the groundwork for public acceptance of America's space program. When President Bush directed NASA in 1989 to prepare plans for an orbiting space station, lunar research bases, and human exploration of Mars, he was largely echoing what von Braun proposed in The Mars Project."The Mars Project is timely.... von Braun's views, seen today against the debate over the role of the shuttle, the development of Space Station Freedom, and the proposal to land Earthlings on Mars early in the next century, raise questions that we still seek to answer."--Jannelle Warren-Findley, co-editor of A Documentary History of the Space AgeThe late Wernher Von Braun came to the United States in 1945, after having been chiefly responsible for the development of Germany's V-2 rockets. He was director of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Huntsville, Alabama. He received eight honorary degrees for his contributions to America's missile and space programs

© Detlev van Ravenswaay