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01462 Gallery

Choose from 133 pictures in our 01462 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping. We are proud to offer this selection in partnership with Memory Lane Prints.


A Yugoslav Squadron flying Spitfires from a Tactical Wing of the Balkan Air Force based Featured 01462 Image

A Yugoslav Squadron flying Spitfires from a Tactical Wing of the Balkan Air Force based

A Yugoslav Squadron flying Spitfires from a Tactical Wing of the Balkan Air Force based in Italy, recently flew their first offensive mission over their homeland. The Squadron, which is entirely staffed by Yugoslavs, was trained by the RAF in the Middle East and has developed from a Yugoslav seaplane squadron, which was formed in the Middle East in 1942. and has since done useful work in Aegean patrols.
Not long ago, some of the present pilots were being trained by the Germans to fly in the Yugoslav "quisling" operations.
However, after their training was nearly completed they escaped to Allied territory in the south of Italy,.
Most of the pilots are experienced flyers and a number were in tho Royal Yugoslav Air Force before the fall of their country.
Although their average ago is somewhat higher than the standard fighter pilots in the RAF, they are
extremely fit and show great determination to drive out the Germans from their country.
So many Yugoslavs have escaped and reached the Allies that another fighter squadron is now in training and will soon join the Balkan Air Force.
Photo shows: WA line of Spitfires of the All Yugoslav Squadron of the BAF being serviced by Yugoslav mechanics before setting out one her first operation.
Picture issued September 1944

© Mirrorpix

It is now possible to reveal the Interesting story behind the shooting down of a JU Featured 01462 Image

It is now possible to reveal the Interesting story behind the shooting down of a JU

It is now possible to reveal the Interesting story
behind the shooting down of a JU 83 from Fair Island off the North of Scotland.
There are ant-aircraft gunners stationed on the island, a tiny speck of land buffeted by gales from the Atlantic and the North Sea, and sometimes cut off for weeks from the mainland.
Once a week a boat fights its way into the little sandy bay bringing ammunition, rations and mail.
A dinghy goes out to meet it because the small jetty is not large enough to accommodate the boat. The
inhabitants of the island are divided mainly into three large families, totalling some seventy persons.
The gunners stationed on the island under the command of Lt. E. J. Reynolds, from Exeter, bake their own bread, do their own washing, and cut their meat in the time old fashion - a complete sheep at a time. The island can be a sanctuary of peace and natural beauty, and it can be a pretty hot spot as witness the occasion when the gunners shot a JU 88 into the sea in 35 seconds.
Picture shows:- The men who shot down the JU 88 at their action stations on the Bofors gun.
Left to right are: Gunner Joseph Philip from east Wemyass, Fife, Gunner John Althorp from Leyton, London, Gunner John Malpas from Kettering, Yorkshire, Gunner James Tiffer from Burton On Trent.
November 1943

© Mirrorpix

WAAF Officers of the Photographic Interpretation Branch in Italy visited the much damaged Featured 01462 Image

WAAF Officers of the Photographic Interpretation Branch in Italy visited the much damaged

WAAF Officers of the Photographic Interpretation Branch in Italy visited the much damaged Foggia area to see the work done by bombers before the invasion of Italy.
They saw the completely destroyed main power station and the extensive damage done to the railway marshalling yards. A few months ago, when they were serving in North Africa some of these officers spent much of their time interpreting aerial reconnaissance photographs of Foggia and other parts of Italy. While at the marshalling yard they were able to see and compare for themselves the destruction as shown in the picture with that as seen from the ground - thereby giving them useful information for future work.
They also called on one of the photographic reconnaissance squadrons to see some of the work which goes on in obtaining the photographs.
Picture shows: WAAF Officers watch pilot Flight Commander G. Fletcher DFC of Kensington, London sign his photographic reconnaissance report.
February 1944

© Mirrorpix