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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection

Ann and Jane Taylor were two sisters who lived in London during the 19th century, and their lives were intertwined with the bustling city they called home

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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: The Royal Academy, Covent Garden and the British Museum
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: The General Post-Office, Southwark Bridge and Waterloo Bridge
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: The Lamplighter, Watchman and Link-boy
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: Skating, the Hard Frost and the Fire-plug
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: Chair-mender, News Boy, Flying Pieman and Blackfriars Bridge
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: Nosegays, Watercress girl, Brewers Dray and Twopenny-Post Boy
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: The Custom House, the Press Gang and the Tower of London
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: The Bellman, a London Wharf and Coal-ship and coal barge
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: New London Bridge, Billingsgate and the Scavenger
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: Calligraphic title page with vignette of the city of London with Saint Pauls Cathedral
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: The Sedan Chair, the Milkmaid and the Sailors and Ship
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: Tombs in Westminster Abbey, Westminster Hall and Westminster Bridge
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: Guy Fawkes in Effigy, Bartholomews Hospital and Smithfield Market
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: The Fire-Engine, Drawing Goods on a Truck, East India House and London Stone
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: London Docks, Greenwich Hospital and Chelsea Hospital
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: Charing Cross, Carlton House and the Quadrant, Regent Street
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: Temple Bar, Paviors and Westminster Abbey
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: St Dunstans Church, Postman, Letter Carrier and Knife-Grinder
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: London Guildhall, Gog and Magog and the Mansion House
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: Countrymen on a stage coach, the Monument and Pie Corner
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: Waterman, Ticket Porter, Fellowship Porter, Coachstand and New Milk from the Cow
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: The Admiralty Office, the Sailing Match and the Drowned Boy
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: The Enraged Ox, the Dustman and the Taking of Guy Fawkes
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: The Bank of England, St Pauls Cathedral and the Blue-Coat School or Christs Hospital
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: Dancing Bear and Dog, Camel and Monkey and the Royal Exchange
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: The Jewel Office in the Tower of London, Rag Fair and Old Clothes and Ship Building
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Ann And Jane Taylor Collection: The Tiwer of London: the Armory, the Horse Armory and Wild Beasts in the Tower

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Ann and Jane Taylor were two sisters who lived in London during the 19th century, and their lives were intertwined with the bustling city they called home. They witnessed the transformation of London into a modern metropolis, as it expanded its cultural institutions, transportation networks, and commercial activities. The Royal Academy, Covent Garden, and the British Museum became their favorite haunts. The sisters would spend hours exploring art exhibitions at the Royal Academy, enjoying performances at Covent Garden's theaters, and immersing themselves in knowledge at the British Museum. Their daily routines involved encounters with various characters that made up London's vibrant streetscape. From lamplighters to watchmen and link-boys lighting their way through dark alleys; from skating on frozen ponds during hard frosts to witnessing fire-plug drills by brave firefighters - Ann and Jane experienced it all. They observed street vendors like chair-menders fixing broken furniture or newsboys shouting headlines to grab attention. They relished treats from flying piemen while crossing Blackfriars Bridge or bought nosegays from watercress girls near Southwark Bridge. Twopenny-post boys scurried around delivering letters swiftly amidst busy crowds. London landmarks played significant roles in their lives too. The Custom House represented commerce thriving along the Thames River while nearby Press Gangs reminded them of darker times when men were forcibly enlisted into naval service. The Tower of London stood tall as a symbol of power but also held tales of intrigue within its ancient walls. The sound of bellmen announcing news echoed through London's wharves where coal-ships docked alongside coal barges waiting for unloading. New London Bridge connected bustling Billingsgate market where fishmongers shouted prices amid a sea of activity while scavengers kept streets clean amidst chaos. A calligraphic title page depicting St Paul's Cathedral showcased how religion remained an integral part of life even amidst urbanization.