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Angel Wynn Collection

"Angel Wynn: Embracing the Rich Cultural Heritage of Native American Tribes" Step into the world of Angel Wynn

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Angel Wynn Collection: Indian corn, also known as maize, was historically cultivated by tribes in Oklahoma
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Angel Wynn Collection: The Algonkin Indians lived in bark covered dwellings called wigwams. Their houses
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Angel Wynn Collection: Algonquin Indian village traditionally was made of bark covered dwellings such as wigwams
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Angel Wynn Collection: Traditional Hopi girl, Povi Lomayauma 16 year old teenager, dressed in traditionally
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Angel Wynn Collection: Choctaw Indians of Louisianna, Mississippi and Alabama grew sweetcorn as a food staple
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Angel Wynn Collection: Sundance lodge constructed for the annual renewal ceremony held in the summer months
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Angel Wynn Collection: Arapaho traditional homelands in Wyoming with a heard of horses in the foreground
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Angel Wynn Collection: Tipi sits on the banks of the Wind River that winds through a steep walled canyon
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Angel Wynn Collection: General George Custer and Elizabeth Custers 1875 home during his time at Fort Abraham Lincoln
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Angel Wynn Collection: Single tepee pictched on Arapaho traditional homelands near La Junta Colorado along
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Angel Wynn Collection: Tule reed wetlands was a source of building materials for the Ohlone Costanoan tribes
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Angel Wynn Collection: The Wampanoag Indians were known as the people of the first light. A mystical sunrise
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Angel Wynn Collection: Moose were a valuable resource to the Algonkin Indians of Canada and hunted primarily
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Angel Wynn Collection: Algonkin Indians cooked their meals over open fires using spits and clay cooking pots
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Angel Wynn Collection: Snow shoes were typically used by the Subarctic and Arctic peoples for walking on deep snow
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Angel Wynn Collection: According to legend, the dreamcatcher catches all dreams, good and bad. Bad dreams
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Angel Wynn Collection: The sundance was practiced by most tribes of the Great Plains, Plateau and Great Basin areas
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Angel Wynn Collection: Bowl of Zuni corn soup made with ingredients of corn, posole, goat meat, chili pepper
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Angel Wynn Collection: Prairie Homestead National Monument is a well-preserved sod house kept in good condition
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Angel Wynn Collection: Many oil rigs are set up throughout Oklahoma on Tribally owned land such as here on Cherokee ground
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Angel Wynn Collection: Pictograph of the legendary figure called Kokopeli who brought the wooden flute
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Angel Wynn Collection: Painted buffalo herd and horses decorate a Lakota Sioux tepee
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Angel Wynn Collection: Oil rig in operation on the Osage Indian Reservation today. The Osage Tribe s
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Angel Wynn Collection: Downtown Ketchikan is very quaint town which is built out over the water and it s
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Angel Wynn Collection: Tlingit carved and painted wooden totem pole on display at the University of Alaska
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Angel Wynn Collection: Traditionally the Tlingit used wood stakes and cedar pins to slow cook salmon over
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Angel Wynn Collection: Hopi Indians visited Canyon de Chelly after AD 1300 and established year round residences
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Angel Wynn Collection: Wupatki Ruins National Monument was home to an Anasazi culture, the ancestors to the Hopi
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Angel Wynn Collection: Eagle Butte, mountians of the Hopi Buttes located on the Hopi Indian Reservation in Arizona
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Angel Wynn Collection: Scenic views of Hopi Reservation lands from the Second Mesa. The Hopi homelands are
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Angel Wynn Collection: Traditional Hopi Eagle dancer, Clay Kewanwy (Hopi Tewa), dressed in dance regalia
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Angel Wynn Collection: 10 year old Hopi boy, Clay Kewanwytewa, dressed in traditional yucca headband, turquoise
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Angel Wynn Collection: Hopi-Tewa eagle dancers dressed in traditional regalia of woven apron, sash, moccasins
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Angel Wynn Collection: Traditional Hopi dancer demonstrating a Hopi hunting dance with bow and quiver during
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Angel Wynn Collection: The Algonkin Indians made and used snow shoes for hunting and trapping during the


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"Angel Wynn: Embracing the Rich Cultural Heritage of Native American Tribes" Step into the world of Angel Wynn, where the vibrant history and traditions of Native American tribes come alive. From the Algonkin Indians' bark-covered wigwams to the Choctaw's sweetcorn fields, every aspect tells a story. Indian corn, also known as maize, holds a special place in Oklahoma's tribal history. It was cultivated by tribes who cherished its significance and nourishing qualities for generations. In an Algonquin Indian village, you can witness the beauty of their traditional dwellings - wigwams adorned with bark covers. These structures were not just homes but symbols of unity and protection. Hopi girl Povi Lomayauma showcases her tribe's rich heritage through her traditional attire. At just 16 years old, she carries on ancient customs that have been passed down through countless generations. The Sundance lodge stands tall as a symbol of renewal during annual ceremonies held in summer months. Its construction is meticulous and purposeful - a testament to the spiritual connection between man and nature. Arapaho traditional homelands in Wyoming offer breathtaking views with horses grazing peacefully in the foreground. This land has witnessed centuries of resilience and harmony between humans and animals. General George Custer's home at Fort Abraham Lincoln takes us back to a pivotal era in American history. It serves as a reminder of both triumphs and tragedies that shaped our nation. Snowshoes were essential tools for Subarctic and Arctic peoples navigating deep snow-covered terrains. They represent adaptability and resourcefulness amidst challenging environments. On Arapaho traditional homelands near La Junta Colorado, a single tepee stands proudly against picturesque landscapes. It symbolizes strength, resilience, and reverence for ancestral lands. Angel Wynn embraces these diverse aspects of Native American culture with utmost respect and admiration. Through artistry or storytelling, they aim to preserve and honor the legacies of these remarkable tribes.