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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
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Police Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Police can be found in London, England, United Kingdom in Europe

Choose from 1208 pictures in our Police collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Pink Floyds Inflatable Pig Battersea Power Station Featured Police Print

Pink Floyds Inflatable Pig Battersea Power Station

A 40-foot long inflatable pig suspended between two of the chimneys at Battersea Power Station, London, during a photoshoot for the cover of Pink Floyd's album Animals, 6th November 1976. Whether it was an epic publicity stunt or a genuine mishap remains a topic of debate in some circles. Either way, the cover shoot for 1977's Animals became one of Pink Floyd's signature moments.
Roger Waters and artist Aubrey Powell, co-founder of the art group Hipgnosis, came up with the concept of an inflatable pig floating over Britain's iconic Battersea Power Station. But things didn't go as planned at the December 1976 photo shoot, as the 40-foot balloon broke from its moorings on one of Battersea's southern chimneys, rising directly into the path of planes landing at Heathrow Airport. All flights were grounded, and Powell was arrested, even as police helicopters and the Royal Air Force arrived to chase the pig. It eventually fell to the ground miles way in Kent.
(Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

© 2008 Getty Images

Busker who Popped-in to the BBC Featured Police Print

Busker who Popped-in to the BBC

Don Partridge, 23, the man who gave up many jobs to become a London busker, seen entertaining outside the Paris Studio, Lower Regent Street, London. Afterwards he went into the studio-theatre to appear in the British Broadcasting Corporation's live radio show "Pop-in". He has made such a success of busking that he has already appeared on Independent Television with his one-man band, and has had recordings released. He is also making money, despite - as he himself says - having been "nicked" by the police about 20 or 30 times

© PA Archive/Press Association Images

Humour comment The New Police Act 19th century cartoon Featured Police Print

Humour comment The New Police Act 19th century cartoon

This is a cartoon etching by the well-known Victorian social caricaturist / cartoonist George Cruikshank (1792 - 1878), dated November 1st, 1829. (1829 is in the reign of William IV, but most of Cruikshank's artistic work was in the long reign of Queen Victoria.) Cruikshank went on to illustrate a number of the books of Charles Dickens. Title: The New Police Act Additional text: The FINISH Description: In 1829 Britain saw The Metropolitan Police Act, an Act of Parliament introduced by Sir Robert Peel. The Act replaced the former system of parish constables and watchmen with the Metropolitan Police of London. This is often considered to be the first modern police force, and its members took their name from the Act's founder ? bobbies or peelers'. Cruikshank's cartoon hints at the resentment that followed the setting up of such a body of men. Designed Etched & Published by Geo. Cruikshank ? Novr. 1st 1829 More cartoons by George Cruikshank

© Whiteway