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Sir Joshua Reynolds Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 140 pictures in our Sir Joshua Reynolds collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


John Vivian of Pencalenick, John Opie (1761-1807) Featured Sir Joshua Reynolds Print

John Vivian of Pencalenick, John Opie (1761-1807)

Oil on canvas, English School, around 1780. A portrait of a young John Vivian of Pencalenick (1772-1817). Vivian later became a Barrister and was High Sheriff of Cornwall in 1812. John Opie was born in Harmony Cottage, Trevellas, between St Agnes and Perranporth in Cornwall. He was the youngest of the five children of Edward Opie, a master carpenter, and his wife Mary (nee Tonkin). He showed a precocious talent for drawing and mathematics, and by the age of twelve he had mastered the teachings of Greek mathematician Euclid and opened an evening school for poor children where he taught reading, writing and arithmetic. His father, however, did not encourage his abilities, and apprenticed him to his own trade of carpentry. Opie's artistic abilities eventually came to the attention of local physician and satirist, Dr John Wolcot (who used the pen name Peter Pindar), who visited him at the sawmill where he was working in 1775. Recognising a great talent, Wolcot became Opie's mentor, buying him out of his apprenticeship and insisting that he come to live at his home in Truro. Wolcot provided invaluable encouragement, advice, tuition and practical help in the advancement of his early career, including obtaining many commissions for work. In 1781, having gained considerable experience as a portraitist travelling around Cornwall, Opie moved to London with Wolcot. There they lived together, having entered into a formal profit-sharing agreement. Although Opie had received a considerable artistic education from Wolcot, the doctor chose to present him as a self-taught prodigy; a portrait of a boy shown at the Society of Artists the previous year, had been described in the catalogue as "an instance of Genius, not having ever seen a picture." Wolcot introduced the "Cornish wonder" to leading artists, including Sir Joshua Reynolds, who was to compare him to Caravaggio and Velazquez

© RIC

Lieutenant-General The Honourable Robert Monckton Featured Sir Joshua Reynolds Print

Lieutenant-General The Honourable Robert Monckton

Major-General (later Lieutenant-General) The Honourable Robert Monckton (1726-1782), at the Taking of Martinique, 1762.Oil on canvas by Benjamin West (1738-1820), 1763/4 (c), exhibited at the Society of Artists 1764.Listed in 1762 as a major-general (he later became a lieutenant-general), Monckton is wearing a general officer's frock coat: the single-spaced buttons and loops were later to be used to denote full generals. Still in his thirties, Monckton was a tall, imposing figure, who received the thanks of the House of Commons for his valiant conquest of Martinique.Monckton's military career was largely centred in North America, most significantly as General Wolfe's second-in-command at Quebec in 1759. From 1761-1763, he was Governor of New York. It was thus no coincidence that he chose the young American artist, Benjamin West, to record his grandest moment for posterity. In 1763 West had just arrived in London, en route from Italy to his native Pennsylvania, when he received the commission. His interpretation of the dignified general, with its fashionable Neo-Classical allusion to the Apollo Belvedere, was so successful that it was one of three paintings exhibited in 1764 that launched West's career in England. West went on to receive royal patronage and, in 1792, succeeded Sir Joshua Reynolds as President of the Royal Academy. In its day, his most famous painting, 'The Death of General Wolfe', (National Galleries of Canada), was innovative for treating a contemporary subject as a formal, academic 'history painting', with the principals dressed in their own clothes, as opposed to classical robes.The map in Monckton's right hand and the left-hand detail of the portrait make direct allusion to the most crucial part of the capture of Martinique. There had previously been several unsuccessful British attempts to take this important sugar island. In 1762 it was heavily garrisoned with over 12, 000 French soldiers, local militia and hired 'privateersmen'. Monckton assemb

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library

The Gullett Family, John Opie (1761-1807) Featured Sir Joshua Reynolds Print

The Gullett Family, John Opie (1761-1807)

Oil on canvas, English School, circa 1786. This family portrait by the Cornish artist John Opie, shows Christopher Gullet, Clerk of the Peace for Devon, with his wife Anne and youngest child Georgina. John Opie was born in Harmony Cottage, Trevellas, between St Agnes and Perranporth in Cornwall. He was the youngest of the five children of Edward Opie, a master carpenter, and his wife Mary (nee Tonkin). He showed a precocious talent for drawing and mathematics, and by the age of twelve he had mastered the teachings of Greek mathematician Euclid and opened an evening school for poor children where he taught reading, writing and arithmetic. His father, however, did not encourage his abilities, and apprenticed him to his own trade of carpentry. Opie's artistic abilities eventually came to the attention of local physician and satirist, Dr John Wolcot (who used the pen name Peter Pindar), who visited him at the sawmill where he was working in 1775. Recognising a great talent, Wolcot became Opie's mentor, buying him out of his apprenticeship and insisting that he come to live at his home in Truro. Wolcot provided invaluable encouragement, advice, tuition and practical help in the advancement of his early career, including obtaining many commissions for work. In 1781, having gained considerable experience as a portraitist travelling around Cornwall, Opie moved to London with Wolcot. There they lived together, having entered into a formal profit-sharing agreement. Although Opie had received a considerable artistic education from Wolcot, the doctor chose to present him as a self-taught prodigy; a portrait of a boy shown at the Society of Artists the previous year, had been described in the catalogue as "an instance of Genius, not having ever seen a picture." Wolcot introduced the "Cornish wonder" to leading artists, including Sir Joshua Reynolds, who was to compare him to Caravaggio and Velazquez

© RIC