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Related Images Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 8354 pictures in our Related Images collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Tardigrade or Water Bear Featured Related Images Print

Tardigrade or Water Bear

Water bear or tardigrade. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a water bear (Echiniscus sp., ) walking over spagnum moss. Water bears live in damp habitats such as moss or lichen and are tiny segmented invertebrates. They can survive dry conditions by changing into a dessicated state in which they can remain for many years. Whilst in this form (known as a tun) they can withstand the most extreme environments and can tolerate radiation levels as high as x1000 more than other animals, including humans. They have even been brought back alive after spending 10 days in the vacuum of space! They are classed as extremeophiles. Magnification x1120 (x275 at 10cm wide)

© POWER AND SYRED/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Giant otter eating a fish Featured Related Images Print

Giant otter eating a fish

Giant otter (Pteronura brasiliensis) eating a fish it has caught. This is the largest of the mustelids, with adult males reaching up to 1.8 metres in length and weighing up to 35 kilograms. Females are smaller and slimmer, reaching 1.7 metres and 26 kilograms. It inhabits wetlands in South America east of the Andes, where it feeds on fish, crabs and snakes. Adults have been known to kill and eat caimans. It is primarily a visual hunter, and catches its prey in underwater chases. It lives in groups of up to 20 individuals. Photographed in the Brazilian Pantanal

© Manuel Presti/Science Photo Library

Ammonite fossil, SEM Featured Related Images Print

Ammonite fossil, SEM

Ammonite fossil, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). Ammonites were invertebrates and lived in the sea. They were molluscs that formed a spiral shell to protect their soft body. The lines on the shell mark chambers added as the ammonite grew. It lived in the newest and largest chamber. Shells ranged in width from under 1 centimetre to over 1 metre. Ammonites most closely resemble the present-day nautilus. They first appear in the fossil record around 400 million years ago and became extinct at the end of the Cretaceous period 65 million years ago. Magnification: x30 when printed 10cm wide

© STEVE GSCHMEISSNER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY