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Home > All Images > 2014 > January > 26 Jan 2014

Images Dated 26th January 2014

Choose from 1,096 pictures in our Images Dated 26th January 2014 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Geological map of the British Isles Featured 26 Jan 2014 Print

Geological map of the British Isles

Geological map of the British Isles, with a colour-coded key (right, see C015/2656 for details and names). The geology of the British Isles is extremely varied with rocks from nearly all geological periods. The rock formation types shown are: sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous. The majority of the rocks in Ireland, England and Wales are sedimentary, with large areas of volcanic and metamorphic rocks in Scotland. The sedimentary rocks are colour-coded by geological period from most recent to most ancient (top to bottom). The oldest rocks are in north-west Scotland, the youngest in south-east England. For a simpler map with less detail, see C015/2655

© GARY HINCKS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Major Herbert George Brackley - Superintendant Featured 26 Jan 2014 Print

Major Herbert George Brackley - Superintendant

Major Herbert George Brackley, Superintendant, Imperial Airways, third from left, with the crew of Canopus, including Clive E M Adams third from right, October 1936 prior to its leaving for the Mediterranean. Date: 1936

© Mary Evans Picture Library 2015 - https://copyrighthub.org/s0/hub1/creation/maryevans/MaryEvansPictureID/10847306

1936, Adams, Aeroplane, Aeroplanes, Aircraft, Airplane, Airplanes, Airways, Brackley, Canopus, Clive, Crew, George, Herbert, Imperial, Including, Leaving, Left, Major, Mediterranean, October, Plane, Planes, Prior, Superintendant, Transport

Zeta Ophiuchi bow shock, infrared image Featured 26 Jan 2014 Print

Zeta Ophiuchi bow shock, infrared image

Zeta Ophiuchi bow shock. Infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (SST) of the bow shock in the interstellar medium caused by stellar winds from the fast-moving star Zeta Ophiuchi. This star is around 370 light years from Earth in the constellation of Ophiuchus. Many times hotter, brighter and more massive than our Sun, it is travelling at about 24 kilometres per second. The fine filaments of dust surrounding the star glow primarily at shorter infrared wavelengths (green). The bow shock (about half a light year from the star) is seen at longer infrared wavelengths (red). The shortest wavelengths are in blue. Image published in 2012

© NASA/JPL-CALTECH/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY