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Home > All Images > 2004 > October > 27 Oct 2004

Images Dated 27th October 2004

Choose from 61 pictures in our Images Dated 27th October 2004 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Army Gazelle helicopters carrying trainee Forward Air Controllers (FACs) at RAF Spadeadam Featured 27 Oct 2004 Image

Army Gazelle helicopters carrying trainee Forward Air Controllers (FACs) at RAF Spadeadam

Pictured are Army Gazelle helicopters carrying trainee Forward Air Controllers (FACs) at RAF Spadeadam, Cumbria.
Joint Forward Air Control Training and Standards Unit (JFACTSU) based at RAF Leeming run four-week Forward Air Controllers courses to train individuals, who from a forward position on the ground or in the air, direct the action of combat aircraft engaged in close air support of land forces.
This means talking a fast ground attack aircraft onto a target, from a forward position on a battlefield. Students on the course come from all three Services, all cap badges and various different NATO countries

© CROWN COPYRIGHT

A German telescopic field-periscope Featured 27 Oct 2004 Image

A German telescopic field-periscope

A photograph of a German army field-periscope captured by the French army in 1916. The device, whose telescopic tube could be extended up to twenty-five meters in height, was used to observe the surrounding terrain for great distances and could be packed for travel as shown in the inset picture. The French army officers who discovered the periscope are reported to have at first mistaken their prize for a new type of German artillery

© Mary Evans Picture Library 2015 - https://copyrighthub.org/s0/hub1/creation/maryevans/MaryEvansPictureID/10219637

Devils coach horse beetle, SEM Featured 27 Oct 2004 Image

Devils coach horse beetle, SEM

Devil's coach horse. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the underside of a devil's coach horse beetle (Staphylinus olens). This beetle is found in hedges, gardens and woodlands throughout Europe. It has powerful pincing jaws (centre of head) that it uses to catch and eat its prey of slugs and other insects. Like all beetles it has two segmented antennae on its head, a segmented abdomen (bottom), and six legs. The devil's coach horse beetle is capable of flight (wings not seen) but spends most of its time on the ground

© STEVE GSCHMEISSNER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY