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Home > All Images > 2004 > March > 26 Mar 2004

Images Dated 26th March 2004

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 39 pictures in our Images Dated 26th March 2004 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Baked gingerbread, thermogram Featured 26 Mar 2004 Print

Baked gingerbread, thermogram

Baked gingerbread. Thermogram of gingerbread men cooling on a rack after being baked. The colours show variations in temperature. The scale runs from white (warmest), through yellow, orange, red and purple to blue (coldest). Thermography records the temperature of surfaces by detecting long- wavelength infrared radiation

© TONY MCCONNELL/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Aviation monument Featured 26 Mar 2004 Print

Aviation monument

Aviation monument commemorating the British Fairey F-3 seaplane that made the first flight across the South Atlantic from Lisbon, Portugal to Brazil, in March-June of 1922. Two Portuguese naval officers (Coutinho and Cabral) flew a total of three F-3 seaplanes during the journey. Fuel limitations and mechanical problems required stops for repairs and fuel at remote Atlantic islands. Out of sight of land, they navigated using a sextant that had been specially designed for airplane use. Their first seaplane, the Lusitania, sank after a rough landing. They completed the journey in the Santa Cruz which replaced the Lusitania's replacement, the Portugal. Photographed in Lisbon, Portugal

© SHEILA TERRY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Cup of tea, thermogram Featured 26 Mar 2004 Print

Cup of tea, thermogram

Cup of tea. Image 4 of 4. Thermogram of a hand dipping a biscuit into a cup of tea. The colours show variations in temperature. The scale runs from white (warmest), through yellow, orange, red and purple to blue (coldest). Thermography records the temperature of surfaces by detecting long-wavelength infrared radiation. The biscuit is seen to absorb the hot tea and take up some of the heat, in contrast to the undipped part. The heat of the tea is also seen showing the level of the tea inside the cup. The handle remains cool as it has little contact with the hot surfaces. For a sequence of thermograms showing a cup of tea being made, see images H584/103-106

© TONY MCCONNELL/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY