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Images Dated 26th July 2004

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 62 pictures in our Images Dated 26th July 2004 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


A baby koala named Cooee is held by its mother at Sydneys Taronga Zoo Featured 26 Jul 2004 Print

A baby koala named Cooee is held by its mother at Sydneys Taronga Zoo

A baby koala named Cooee is held by it's mother at Sydney's Taronga Zoo July 26, 2004. A report into the dangerous levels of koalas present on Kangaroo Island, located south of the South Australian city of Adelaide, will be released by the Australian Koala Foundation on Wednesday, with the culling of the colony one of the issues to be discussed. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/David Gray DG/CP - RP5DRHYSOEAB

JPF-9017 Featured 26 Jul 2004 Print

JPF-9017

JPF-9017
Western AUSTRALIA - Hamersley Gorge National Park, Pilbara region. South Fortescue river flows through ironstone strata.
Hamersley Gorge National Park, Pilbara region, Western Australia
Red layer, top half of picture, show remains of deposits of iron oxide, called Banded Iron Formation, which were laid down about 2.5 billion years ago. These could only have formed if the Earths atmosphere contained virtually no oxygen.
Jean Paul Ferrero

© Jean-Paul Ferrero / ardea.com

AIDS plant vaccine: pulping infected cowpea leaves Featured 26 Jul 2004 Print

AIDS plant vaccine: pulping infected cowpea leaves

Plant vaccine for AIDS. Mortar and pestle used to pulp virus-infected leaves of a cowpea plant Vigna unguiculata. By grinding the leaves, viruses are extracted to produce a plant vaccine for AIDS. This research is conducted at the John Innes Institute in Norwich, England. The cowpea plant, grown for black-eye beans, is prone to infection by cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV). This virus is harm- less to humans and ideal for genetic engineering. A gene from the HIV virus (the virus causing AIDS) can be inserted into the CPMV virus. By then infecting cowpea leaves with this altered CPMV virus, an AIDS vaccine of virus particles can be produced and extracted from the plant

© DAVID PARKER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY