Skip to main content
sales@mediastorehouse.co.uk
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
Home > All Images > 2003 > March > 5 Mar 2003

Images Dated 5th March 2003

Available as Framed Photos, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 56 pictures in our Images Dated 5th March 2003 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


On Sunday 3rd July 1938, Mallard raced past Little Bytham at 123 mph (198 kmh), then Featured 5 Mar 2003 Print

On Sunday 3rd July 1938, Mallard raced past Little Bytham at 123 mph (198 kmh), then

On Sunday 3rd July 1938, Mallard raced past Little Bytham at 123 mph (198 kmh), then over the next 1and a quarter miles (2 km) its speed rose until for one quarter mile (0.4 km) stretch it touched 126 mph, (203 kmh). Mallard had achieved a world speed record for steam traction. It is seen here outside the National Railway Museum in York in 1993. The A4 Pacific class Mallard was designed by Sir Nigel Gresley (1876-1941), the chief engineer of the London & North Eastern Railway (LNER)

© Please read our licence terms. All digital images must be destroyed unless otherwise agreed in writing.

White blood cell response Featured 5 Mar 2003 Print

White blood cell response

White blood cell movement. Computer-enhanced confocal light micrograph of white blood cells (red) moving through the intact walls of a blood vessel, a process known as diapedesis. The walls of the cells in the blood vessel wall are green. This is characteristic of the inflammatory response, which occurs at the site of an injury. The cells leave the blood for the surrounding tissues so that they can destroy any invading organisms that may be present. These are T- lymphocyte white blood cells, which help to direct the immune response to foreign organisms. Magnification unknown

© DAVID BECKER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Botulism bacteria Featured 5 Mar 2003 Print

Botulism bacteria

Botulism bacteria. Light micrograph of botulism bacteria (Clostridium botulinum). These bacteria occur naturally in soil. They produce botulinum toxin, a powerful neurotoxin that can be ingested on contaminated, improperly cooked food. The neurotoxin poisons the central nervous system and can cause lethal heart or lung failure. Gram stain. Magnification: x500 at 35mm size

© CNRI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY