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Home > All Images > 2003 > July > 8 Jul 2003

Images Dated 8th July 2003

Choose from 48 pictures in our Images Dated 8th July 2003 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Motor neurone nerve cell and synapses Featured 8 Jul 2003 Print

Motor neurone nerve cell and synapses

Motor neurone and synapses. Computer graphic of a motor neurone and synapses (glowing yellow bulges, at lower centre). The cell body is at centre. It has a central nucleus (red circle) and axons (upper left, lower centre and lower right) for transmitting information and dendrites (branching processes) for receiving information. The motor neurone cell transmits and receives impulses (messages) to and from other nerve cells at junctions called synapses. The impulses are passed across the synapses by chemicals called neurotransmitters. Motor neurones transmit impulses from the brain to muscles or glands in order to inhibit or excite a response

© PASIEKA/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Immunofluorescent LM of neuron fibres & astrocytes Featured 8 Jul 2003 Print

Immunofluorescent LM of neuron fibres & astrocytes

Immunofluorescent light micrograph of a branching nerve fibre, with astrocyte cells, in mammalian brain cortex. In the foreground, the nerve fibre of a mature neuron (yellow) has the appearance of a lightning bolt. This is the route of transmission of nerve impulses. Behind it are astrocytes (orange): star-shaped connective tissue cells providing mechanical support and nutrients for the neurons. It is thought that astrocytes may take part in information storage processes. Immunofluorescence is a staining technique using antibodies to attach fluorescent dyes to specific tissues and molecules within the cell. Magnification x200 at 35mm, x375 at 6x4.5cm

© Nancy Kedersha/Ucla/Science Photo Library

Molecular Model Glycerol Fluid Retention Exercise Featured 8 Jul 2003 Print

Molecular Model Glycerol Fluid Retention Exercise

Glycerol is a Three Carbon Molecule Similar to Alcohol. it Occurs Naturally in the Body as a Component of Stored Fat. a Small Amount is Also Present in Body Fluids as Free Glycerol. when Glycerol is Ingested it is Absorbed and Increases the Concentration of the Fluid in the Blood and Tissues. Athletes Can Retain Water Longer Increasing Performance. Molecular Model Glycerol Fluid Retention Exercise

© Custom Medical Stock Photo