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Home > All Images > 2002 > September > 9 Sep 2002

Images Dated 9th September 2002

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 28 pictures in our Images Dated 9th September 2002 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


False-colour SEM of human skin from a blister Featured 9 Sep 2002 Print

False-colour SEM of human skin from a blister

False colour scanning electron micrograph of human skin from a blister on the palm of the hand (male). The skin on the palm is neatly arranged in ridges (not seen) with sweat pores (seen) appearing as miniature depressions tunnelling into the ridge- peaks. The external surface of skin, the epidermis, consists of keratinised, flattened layers of cells. Keratinization occurs when deposits of the fibrous protein keratin are layed down in the cells, causing them to toughen. This outer layer of cells is shed continuously (flaky) & is replaced by progressive movement & maturation of cells from the skin beneath. Magnification: X71 at 35mm size. Original is BW print P710/152

© DR JEREMY BURGESS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY.

Artwork of the solar corona based on X-ray imagery Featured 9 Sep 2002 Print

Artwork of the solar corona based on X-ray imagery

Solar corona. Artwork, based on X-ray imagery, of the Sun showing the activity of the corona, the outer layer of the solar atmosphere. The corona is formed by gas at very low density but at an extremely high temperature (1 to 5 million degrees Celsius) which causes the intense X-ray emission. The brightest areas are solar active regions where sunspots would be seen in visible light; the darkest regions are coronal holes where the gas density is extremely low and from which the solar wind, a stream of charged particles, is ejected into interplanetary space. Strong magnetic fields bend some flows of coronal material into loops

© Detlev Van Ravenswaay/Science Photo Library