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Cape Verde in Africa

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The village of Fontainhas sits perched amid terraced farmland on Cape Verde's Sao Antao Featured Related Images Print

The village of Fontainhas sits perched amid terraced farmland on Cape Verde's Sao Antao

The village of Fontainhas sits perched amid terraced farmland on Cape Verde's Sao Antao island July 12, 2010. Unscathed by conflict or political instability, Cape Verde has quietly become a middle-income nation and looks set to be one of few in Africa to meet any of the Millennium Development Goals set for measuring progress in improving livelihoods. Yet it has even loftier ambitions. Picture taken July 12, 2010. REUTERS/David Lewis (CAPE VERDE - Tags: SOCIETY TRAVEL BUSINESS IMAGES OF THE DAY)

Los Realejos, Tenerife, Spain - Dragon Tree Featured Related Images Print

Los Realejos, Tenerife, Spain - Dragon Tree

Los Realejos, Tenerife, Spain - Dragon Tree. Dracaena draco, the Canary Islands dragon tree or drago, is a subtropical tree-like plant in the genus Dracaena, native to the Canary Islands, Cape Verde, Madeira, and locally in western Morocco, and introduced to the Azores. It is the natural symbol of the island of Tenerife, together with the blue chaffinch Date: 1913

© Mary Evans / Grenville Collins Postcard Collection

Wild horses gallop in a plowed area of Amajari in the Amazon city of Boa Vista in Featured Related Images Print

Wild horses gallop in a plowed area of Amajari in the Amazon city of Boa Vista in

Wild horses gallop in a plowed area of Amajari in the Amazon city of Boa Vista in the state of Roraima, Brazil, December 2, 2015. The wild horses, known as "Lavradeiro horses" and introduced by colonists, were brought from Portugal, Spain, North Africa and Cape Verde, and are therefore purebred descendants of the Arabian Barbo and Andalusian breeds, according to the INCT (National Science and Technology Institutes Brazil). The original animals escaped from farms and now number around 1,500 horses in the region, according to EMBRAPA (Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation). Picture taken December 2, 2015. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker - GF