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Painting Gallery

Choose from 475 pictures in our Painting collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


The Imposition (Prospect Room, Wollaton Hall, February 2006) by Helena Ben-Zenou Featured Painting Print

The Imposition (Prospect Room, Wollaton Hall, February 2006) by Helena Ben-Zenou

A large dynamic painting, inspired by renovation work in the Prospect Room, Wollaton Hall, February 2006, initially appearing to be an abstract arrangement of angular lines in black, grey and white with dull orange areas. A red and white striped band forms a diagonal across the top area of the painting. A strong white band on the left leads from top to bottom at a slight angle, other lines in grey and orange can be read as scaffolding; windows and stonework can be found in the background. Many areas are textured: the orange areas contain sandstone dust from Wollaton Hall

Dick Elffers Featured Painting Print

Dick Elffers

1910-1990. Born: Rotterdam, Netherlands. Studied at the Willem de Kooning Academy as graphic designer. He developed into a versatile artist: illustrator, painter, printmaker, book binding designer, sculptor, ceramist and photographer

© Mary Evans / Peter & Dawn Cope Collection

Allegory of Fortune Featured Painting Print

Allegory of Fortune

Allegory of Fortune. Lippi, Lorenzo 1606-1665. The depiction of a human figure personifying an abstract concept such as youth or beauty is called an allegory. The young woman in this painting is an allegory of fortune and the monkey, who appears to be selecting playing cards, symbolises chance. The association of fortune with man?s ability to shape his destiny by swift, decisive action was a popular concept during the Renaissance. It derived from the classical idea of fortune being an unpredictable force which must be seized to ensure success. Born in Florence, Lippi was a pupil of Matteo Rosselli from whom he learnt the fine, searching drawing skills of the Florentine workshop tradition. During the 1630s Lippi drew increasingly from nature, a skill described by his biographer Balducci as ?his pure imitation of reality?. Lippi also developed a restrained, classical style that abandoned the richly patterned fabrics and elaborate jewellery favoured by other Seventeenth century Florentine painters

© National Museums NI / MARY EVANS